SATURDAY 24th June

Noon & 8pm & 4am

PLAYS/DRAMA

FOUR AGES BY COLIN LEWISOHN

Bernie Hearn is a hero. Not the sort who wears underpants over his trousers, Bernie is an everyday hero who has led a great life. Four Ages tells his story – what he means to his family, how he protects his sister from injustice, stops a war time atrocity, pulls a lad back from the brink of the ultimate betrayal – all whilst combating his own personal tragedy. Four Ages in the life of one extraordinary man. Bereavement, love, war, justice and abuse. Everyday stuff really!

ANNIVERSARY BY DAVID MILLER

An old gentleman shares his memories with his partner of 54 years…

 

1pm & 9pm & 5am

IN CONVERSATION….CHARLES SIMIC

Charles Simic has published over sixty books of poetry as well as many translations of French, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, and Slovenian poetry. He was born in Yugoslavia in 1938 and moved with his family to the United States in 1953. His poetry first appeared in The Chicago Review .The poet Seamus Heaney described Simic’s work as, “Surrealist, and therefore comic, but with a specific gravity in his imagining that manages to avoid the surrealist penalty of weightlessness.”

 

2pm & 10pm & 6am

POETRY…KEVIN YOUNG

Kevin Young often finds meaning and inspiration for his poetry in African American music, particularly the blues. His seven collections include Ardency: A Chronicle of the Amistad Rebellion(Knopf, 2011) and Dear Darkness. His Jelly Roll: A Blues, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and winner of the Paterson Poetry Prize. He is the editor of five volumes, including 2010’s The Art of Losing: Poems of Grief and Healing. His recent book The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness won the 2010 Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and combines essay, cultural criticism, and lyrical chorus to illustrate ways African American culture is American culture. “I don’t mean to taxonomize but to rhapsodize. Take it from me—mean mean mean to be free.”

 

3pm & 11pm & 7am

GORGEOUS WOMEN

Women – we are the gentler sex or the deadlier of the species but universally it is agreed that we are good talkers, as Radio Gorgeous aptly delivers for ABR. Sometimes frivolous but always fabulous and today features LUCINDA RILEY,the international best selling romantic novelist and head chef FLORENCE KNIGHT talking about her book A Cook and Her Cupboard.

 

4pm & Midnight & 8am

SHERLOCK HOLMES CLASSICS

ABR is proud to present two classic episodes, this time starring Tom Conway as Holmes. ‘The Adventure of the Haunted Bagpipes’ is’ followed by ‘The Sussex Vampire.’

We close the hour with an author interview from KOBO and today’s guest is NICK SAUL.

 

5pm & 1am & 9am

SPARK LONDON

The concept is stand out simple. Real people telling real stories. Today’s are KEEP BREATHING by CATHERINE SEMARK and BROTHERS BY ROB LAWRENCE.

A WORD IN YOUR EAR

Word in Your Ear are a Bath based collective of writers who gather to tell their stories. They liked the way our ancestors enjoyed stories – by listening to them. We totally agree with them so let’s have a listen to CLEOPATRA’S NEEDLED by STEPHANIE WESTON, PROSPECTS BY GEOFFREY HEPTONSTALL and a second offering from STEPHANIE WESTON entitled BRIEF ENCOUNTER.

TAKE FIVE

We asked the same five questions to a range of writers – today it’s…

OLIVIA LICHTENSTEIN, BAFTA winning documentary maker and talented writer of page turner Mrs Zhivago of Queen’s Park and intriguing Things Your Mother Never Told You. Both as a visualist and wordsmith she is engaging and thoughtful with a viewpoint that’s both modern and mature.

 

6pm & 2am & 10am

HOLLYWOOD STAGE

Hollywood is indelibly printed in our minds as a go to place for entertainment and has been for decades. We take you back in time as The Hollywood ringmaster himself, CECIL B DE MILLE unveils…The Sidewalks of London featuring CHARLES LAUGHTON

 

7pm & 3am & 11am

SHORT STORIES

ADVENTURES OF A STROLLING PLAYER BY OLIVER GOLDSMITH. READ BY T.P. MCKENNA.

In this uproarious story of a traveling player who likes to embellish things somewhat, Goldsmith explores the fickleness of fame.

THE CAT THAT WALKED BY HIMSELF BY RUDYARD KIPLING. READ BY LIZA GODDARD.

Rudyard Kipling used to tell his daughter, Josephine, stories in which he invented funny answers for such questions as “How did the camel get his hump?” and “How did the leopard get his spots?”. In 1902 he compiled them into a book called Just So Stories, because his daughter insisted on them being told “just so”. The stories end in amusing poems that summarize the stories themselves. Another of the Just So Stories was called “The cat that walked by himself.” It tells us the reasons why many people prefer dogs to cats.

SREDNI VASHTAR BY SAKI. READ BY EVE KARPF.

The story of a ten-year-old boy called Conradin, who lives with his strict cousin and guardianMrs. De Ropp. Conradin rebels against her and invents a new religion for himself, which centres on idolising a polecat-ferret he calls Sredni Vashtar; a vengeful, merciless god. Conradin keeps the ferret hidden in a cage in the garden shed, and worships the idol in secret. The story comes to a climax when his cousin sets out to discover his god.