SUNDAY 24th Sept

Noon & 8pm & 4am

PLAYS/DRAMA

MARX IN SOHO by Howard Zinn  Actor, teacher and activist Brian Jones plays Karl Marx in the late Howard Zinn’s amusing one person play that looks at Marx’s life, relationships, his analysis of society and his passion for radical change.

 

1pm & 9pm & 5am

IN CONVERSATION

JEREMY SCAHILL is an investigative reporter, war correspondent and author of international bestselling books including Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield.  He has reported from war zones across the globe and his work has sparked several Congressional investigations and won some of journalism’s highest honors..

 

2pm & 10pm & 6am

POETS & POETRY….CLAUDIA RANKINE

Claudia Rankine reads her own work and then is interviewed by Saskia Hamilton.

Claudia has written lyrics, essays, film scripts, a play that was performed on a bus and a recent collection of poems called Citizen.  She questions the personal and public self and plays with media, genre, style and punctuation.

 

3pm & 11pm & 7am

ALTERNATIVE RADIO….

Here at Audiobook Radio we are keen to provide a range of voices – very literally as well as in terms of opinions and views of the world. This strand created by Alternative Radio does just that. We will hear from some of the most informed minds and greatest social activists of our time whose take on justice and power does not chime with those that hold the power and don’t provide justice for all so we rarely get to hear from them in mainstream media. Different opinions always help inform our own and we are always eager to hear from listeners about this or any other strand. Contact us on the tab at www.audiobookradio.net.

Today’s talk on the Limits of Academic Freedom is given by Steven Salaita Edward Said Chair of American Studies at the American University of Beirut.  He is the author of Arab American Literary Fictions, Cultures and Politics, Anti-Arab Racism in the USA and Uncivil Rites: Palestine and the Limits of Academic Freedom.

 

4pm & Midnight & 8am

THEATRE ROYAL

The very name summons up something of grandeur and eloquence – and it was. Hosted by Laurence Olivier these big name productions – also including the acting talents of Sir John Gielgud, Orson Welles and Robert Morley – were based on works by the world’s leading authors – Charles Dickens, Henry James, Oscar Wilde, Anton Chekhov and Robert Louis Stevenson are but a few of whose company we shall be keeping.  Today we raise the curtain on a play based on a short story by Brett Harte called The Luck of Roaring Camp introduced and starring SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER

THE NEW ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES featuring BASIL RATHBONE and NIGEL BRUCE in more of these timeless classic adventures.

 

5pm & 1am & 9am

PUBLISHER’S WEEKLY

ABR welcomes Publisher’s Weekly, an authority on all things books & publishing for a look at the current bestseller’s list in the US, an interview with a successful author as well as forthcoming news for the week ahead. Their podcast is presented by Mark Rotella

TAKE FIVE

We asked the same five questions to a range of writers – today award winning writer NIKESH SHUKLA who adds well observed characters and humour to our contemporary cultural landscape.

 

6pm & 2am & 10am

HOLLYWOOD STAGE

Hollywood is indelibly printed in our minds as a go to place for entertainment and has been for decades. We take you back in time as CECIL B DE MILLE introduces I Wanted Wings starring RAY MILLAND, VERONICA LAKE & WILLIAM HOLDEN.

 

7pm & 3am & 11am

SHORT STORIES

THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING BY RUDYARD KIPLING READ BY RICHARD MITCHLEY  Part II

This fascinating story was inspired by fact and as Henry James remarked ‘an extraordinary tale.’  Masterfully told in the first person by a British journalist who we suspect is Kipling himself, it was made into a movie by John Houston which Humphrey Bogart asked to appear in, such is the story’s appeal.

A WARNING IN RED BY  VICTOR L. WHITECHURCH READ BY PATRICK MALAHIDE

Apparently Whitechurch was the first writer to send his stories to be vetted by Scotland Yard so we can assume that this tale is accurate but the genre is more horror than detective.  A must for trainspotters!